Boulder, CO Compulsive Intensive with Scott Kiloby

IMG_0240Awhile back, I wrote about the impact of the Compulsion Inquiry on my life, and on the lives of others we’ve worked with live and in sessions. You can read all about it here, in general, and its relationship to the homeostatic body here. The point is, we’ve seen some good come from the CI, for all kinds of people with all kinds of compulsions and all kinds of addictions. If you’re interested in finding out what this is all about, I hope you’ll join Scott and I in Boulder, CO, on March 1-3. Maybe you’re addicted to a substance or an activity. Maybe there is something you’d like to think about or act upon…just a little less compulsively. This is what we look at with the CI. We’re leading away from compulsion and addiction, towards freedom.

There are some spots left, and you can register at ScottKilobytalks.com. Pretty sure you’ll be glad you came.  You can contact me at colette.kelso@gmail.com if you have any other questions. Here are three posts that explain more about the CI:

The Compulsion Inquiry~Self as Contraction, Manifesting as Compulsion

Beyond Compulsion

Homeostasis and Compulsive Behavior

Hope to see you there.

Homeostasis and Compulsive Behavior

In trials using the Compulsion Inquiry (CI), it has been observed that addiction and compulsive behaviors have a lot to do with the body functioning as a homeostatic organism, not just in regard to physical well-being, i.e. temperature regulation and fevers, but energetically as well. It’s as if there is a baseline, which in this case appears to be rest, relaxation, and ultimately what we might call peace. When we get excited, we drink, we smoke, have sex, or we might engage in other stabilizing activities. When we’re upset, and this is clearly the case—we eat, we fidget and pace, all the above, and so on.

There is an often unquestioned assumption that the drink, the cigarette, the sex, or the piece of cake causes this relaxation response. We come to believe that we must do something, anything, to get back to “normal,” or rest, relaxation, and peace. And when we’re low energetically, i.e. boredom, we feel the need to get high, or higher. Thus we eat sweets, take drugs, look at porn, or go shopping, or bungee-jumping. Even joy and bliss can seem like “too much,” at times, so we do/eat/smoke something to take it down a notch.

Self medicating is nothing new, but to look at the energetic component, and to see there is this ongoing need to stabilize, is to make conscious this unconscious regulating mechanism. Find the baseline that exists independent of any substance or activity, and the whole roller coaster slows down to a pleasant rhythm, if not to a different beat entirely. That beat is the natural state, calling all to dance to a primordial pulse. The relaxation point discovered in the CI points this this natural state, experienced independent of substance and/or activity.

Note that it is the body that is homeostatic in its natural tendency towards wellbeing. It is a balancing act only for the presumed self. The self, or supposed doer, is the unconscious aspect—that which appears to act for its own immediate “gratification,” and only appears to have some control over what is otherwise a natural process. Peace is the body’s instinctive objective. The fictional self, in play, turns this natural tendency into a comic/tragic display of Charlie Chaplinesque antics to the contrary.

Compulsion Inquiry sessions will be widely available on or before October 1st . They are being offered now on a limited basis. And of course, as always, that which is purely conceptual can only be experienced, and is not offered or expected to be accepted as true.